Showing posts with label Mortgage Loan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mortgage Loan. Show all posts

Friday, April 12, 2019

Credit Repair Companies can Help Fix your Credit Score


Credit repair companies, Credit repair services, Best credit repair companies.

There was a time, and it was not so long ago, when you could get a home loan from pretty much anyone you wanted to irrespective of how good or bad your credit score was. Today, lenders are looking for much improved credit scores if you are to get a loan from them and for some reason or the other that just doesn’t happen. People don’t have that kind of score on hand. And so if you are looking to get a loan or a mortgage you will be left high and dry as one lender after the next lets you down nicely or not so nicely. And did you employers also use credit scores to decide who to hire? What can be done about a bad score then? Well, simple. You turn it over to credit repair companies.

Credit repair companies, as the name might suggest to you, helps you fix up that credit score and makes you much better off financially than you were before. You can do all of the legwork yourself or you can hire one of several possible credit repair companies. And these credit repair companies will get the job done for you if you feel you’re not capable of fixing up that credit problem of yours yourself. If you don’t, that broken credit score could be a real problem, so it does make


sense to fix things one way or the other. A basic Google search or a glance at the telephone directory will reveal to you that there are several credit repair companies out there that are ready to help. Some are more evil than the rest though, so choose wisely.

Choosing the right one among several credit repair companies will help you boost that credit score of yours rapidly and it is the big decision you have to make. But how do you choose the right credit repair company? Well, see, that’s the easy part. The right credit repair company will not demand a large sum of money upfront. They’ll make a promise and deliver it and offer client references whenever asked for. Their contract will clearly state what they will do for you and will not pressure you. And of course, they will have some para legals on their team for assistance. See if all those check boxes are ticked off.

Of course, they will be more expensive than doing it yourself, but it’s always better to hire them when you don’t know how to go about doing things. These credit repair companies take at least 3-6 months to get the job done and they will charge a monthly fee. Some will also have a setup fee. That money is used to order your credit reports and develop a plan to improve your credit score. If you are still looking to not spend that money, find out ways to get it done yourself.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Personal Finance Loans Might be Just What you Need

Personal Finance Loans Might be Just What you Need

Perhaps you are hard up for money but no one will extend you a loan. Maybe you have made late payments on your credit cards to the extent that you have shot your credit score to bits. Now, in your hour of need, no one will be giving you a loan. What do you? Have no worries, because like a knight in armor come to save the fading day, you can always use personal finance loans as a way out of this little mess that you’ve made for yourself.

Normally, getting personal finance loans are easy as hell and you can get them without much of a hitch at all. Normally, the formalities of these personal finance loans are easy to complete and you won’t have to wait a lot at all. The fact is that these loans are much smaller than the common loan that you find out there and so they can be put towards any use imaginable. Want to fix up the car? Check. Want to do up the home? Check. Want to go on a vacation? Check. Want to use it to pay for hookers, alcohol and drugs? Check. See how easy it is to get one of many possible personal finance loans?

Many people that do get this kind of loan make sure that it is an unsecured loan. The problem with getting an unsecured loan is that the interest rates that will be levied on this loan will be higher than normal. But that is only true if you are asking for a large amount of money. After all, if you’re going to take an unsecured loan the banker will want some kind of proof of good faith that you’re not going to vanish with his money forever! Financial institutions don’t really care what you intend to do with this money so long as you repay it in a timely manner and in full.

Depending on how much you borrowed and the terms of the borrowing, the repayment of the article can go on for a few months or even a few years. The general rule of thumb though is that you should try to repay it as soon as possible so as to avoid hefty interest charges. Not only will you save on interest, but you will also be able to improve the credit score that saw you head for personal finance loans in the first place, nipping the root of the problem in the bud.

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Sunday, April 7, 2019

Meditations on Money for the Inner Soul: Understand Road Blocks, Karmic Blocks, and How You Manifest Wealth

Meditations on Money for the Inner Soul: Understand Road Blocks, Karmic Blocks, and How You Manifest Wealth

We live in a time in history in which wealth has taken on a new collective meaning. There are more wealthy people than ever before, and in the collective imagination, we have a newly created vision of a standard of living that we consider our birthright. Credit cards, mortgages, and car loans mean we can experience ourselves as being well-off without it necessarily being based in reality. Whole countries live off debt and fake money. It’s all very confusing when there are still large areas of the world dealing with famine and disease on a scale that is unheard of in what is termed the ”developed” world.

The inequality and illusory nature of wealth are not the only reasons to be wary of its seductions. Even if you thought you were well-off, chances are that whatever wealth you thought you possessed has diminished in recent times. The upheaval in the world’s financial markets has made it only too clear that worshipping at the altar of materialism is a risky business.

So how do we navigate this treacherous territory at a time when material greed and expectation have reached heights that Socrates probably never even imagined? At a time in which global finances are in such rapid flux that no one can predict what will happen next?

First of all, stay close to yourself. Listen to your dreams and imaginings, and your inner promptings. Take yourself seriously. The soul will not lead you in the wrong direction if you pay attention. Learn to distinguish between the inner soul voice and the conditioned fantasy voice, and pay close attention to how manifestation functions for you.

The following are some questions that will help you work through your thoughts about money. Write these in your journal, and take some time to meditate on and write about each one.

  • Where does your money tend to come from? Do you get funds from your family, from your spouse, from hard work, from throwing big parties, from creating works of art?
  • How does money come to you? Does it come in sudden wind-falls or in regular paychecks? Does it come happily or unhappily?
  • What are your open gates for receiving money, and where do you think you might be closed? Visualize the gates through which money comes to you and see why some are closed. Find out what it would take to open them.
  • How does stuff come to you? Is it different from how money comes to you? (Sometimes people have a knack for attracting things over money because they have a negative belief about money itself.)
  • Look for where life is easy for you and see if that lesson can be applied to the realms that are more difficult. For example, if you have easy, plentiful friendships with women, think about working in a field in which women will be your clients or customers.
  • Examine your family of origin issues. Every family has its trips about money. What did you learn about money as a child? If money was lacking, what concepts has that imparted to your thinking? If you were born into a family that had money and that you have inherited, accept this as your fate and use the money to further your soul dream, which will often be philanthropic and/or socially responsible.
  • Look at where you disrespect money and waste it, and clean up your act. Look at your ethics and see if you feel entirely comfortable with all your choices.
  • Add up how much money you spend a year in interest and see what you can do to turn that negative into a positive by earning the money before you spend it.

Gratitude practice is useful in clarifying our relationship with money. Think about all the financial help you have received in your life and give thanks for it. Gratitude blocks can often arise around money because it can be such a charged issue, bringing up issues of entitlement in particular.

If you feel you don’t have as much money as you need, look at what useful function the lack of money might serve for you spiritually. For example, if you tend to be scattered in your thoughts and actions, a lack of money might serve to focus you on what is really necessary. Imagine having all the money you think you need and see how you feel. Within that you may find clues to why you might be blocking yourself from being wealthier.

Practice respect for but also detachment from money. The gods and goddesses of money seem to like us to pay close attention but to also be relaxed. (That applies to just about everything, though, doesn’t it?)

Give space in your perceptions for the possibility that everything right now is absolutely perfect – that the restrictions you experience on the material level are actually part of the divine plan of your soul for your ultimate fulfillment. Do this while vowing to free yourself of karmic restrictions brought about by erroneous thoughts and actions regarding money, work, and material anxiety.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Lara Owen, author of Growing You Inner Light: A Guide to Independent Spiritual Practice (Copyright © 2009 by Lara Owen), has trained with spiritual teachers all over the world and has made a lifelong study of spiritual practice in several traditions. 
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Saturday, April 6, 2019

How to Sell Your House by Lease Options

How to Sell Your House by Lease Options

How to Sell Your House by Lease Options - Many people buy a house then have to move within a few years, due to divorce, relocation or financial difficulties. Without any equity though, it can be nearly impossible to find buyers and you still have realtor fees to contend with. There is a simple, easy way to have your payments taken care of for you and find a buyer, so that you can move onto your new life quickly and easily.


Homeowners can sell their homes by lease option.

What are the benefits of selling my house on a lease option?

When you lease option your house, you sell the right to purchase your home at a set price within a predetermined period of time. During that time, the purchaser of the lease option pays you a set monthly fee. They pay what amounts to their "rent" to you with the provision that they can purchase your house within a certain period of time and have part of the rent that they have paid you applied to their final purchase price.

Q What are the advantages of selling my home by lease option over listing it with a Realtor?

By selling your home in this way, you avoid realtor fees and some other closing costs. You also have a tenant who intends to purchase your property. They will take better care of the home than a renter would and may even fix it up a bit for you. You also, naturally, have your payments taken care of and keep the tax benefits of owning your home, until the final sale.

Q How long does it take before your tenant/buyer cashes me out?

A That depends on a number of different factors. Many people with less than perfect credit can rebuild their credit and receive a mortgage from a mortgage broker within 6 consecutive payments.

Q Why don'’t I just sell the house myself?

If you have little or no equity in your home, it will not be considered a good investment by most buyers.

Q What if my tenant/buyer doesn'’t buy the house?

A It is important to pre-screen buyers to make sure that they want to buy the house and are able to buy it at some point in the future. However, circumstances can change in someone'’s life, such as an unexpected job transfer, that make it necessary to move. In situations like that, a new tenant buyer would have to be found.
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Monday, April 1, 2019

Attaining A Debt Free Lifestyle

Attaining A Debt Free Lifestyle

Many people have been taught that you cannot get ahead without debt. We are also inundated with advertising telling us we can have anything we want. All we need to do is put it on our credit card.

We have become an impatient society, we want it right now. We have lost the ethic of working for what we want.

It is not how much money you make; it is what you do with it. By living without debt you can actually have a higher income since you are not paying out interest, you are actually getting paid interest on invested money.

All debt is not created equal. We will classify them as good debt and bad debt.

To simplify the classification we will say that good debt is a loan for something that you could sell at any time and repay the debt. This narrows down good debt to a home loan and possibly a home equity loan.

A bad debt, of course, is a loan on anything that will lose value.

Let's take a look at some debts that we would consider bad debt.

Home equity loans are in the gray area. They could be considered good debt if they are used to repair or improve your home, but you would be a lot better off to just save up the money for the project. Home equity loans become bad debt when used for purposes other than home improvement or maintenance. In other words a bad home equity loan is for anything that does not add to the value of your house. Do not jeopardize your home by taking out a home equity loan on unnecessary items.

One possible good use for a home equity loan is when the interest rates are low. You can use a home equity loan to refinance your mortgage. Home equity loans generally have lower costs than conventional home loans.

We consider school loans bad debt. If you finish school, get a good high paying job and then attack the loan like mad, a school loan may work out. The problem is that there are too many things that can go wrong. At best, even if you do graduate and get a good job there are always a lot of other expenses at this time in ones life. You are really behind financially when you start your working life in debt.

Auto loans are bad loans that have become common practice to us. We pay interest on a vehicle that will only be worth one half of its original purchase price in five years. Lately it has also been common for us to borrow more than a vehicle is worth. We can trade a car in that we still owe on, and roll that owed amount over into another vehicle. This gives us a loan amount that is higher than the value of the car that we drive away. We have lost our capacity to say NO.

Co-signing is a bad debt that usually and unfortunately involves family. If someone cannot qualify for a loan at a regular lending institution, they should not get a loan. The fact that they can'’t qualify for a loan elsewhere should tell you that they are a huge risk. Use this opportunity to teach them how they can get what they want by working harder for it and delaying the purchase.

If you want to get off of the debt treadmill, you must run as far away from debt as you can. You cannot use debt to get out of debt. Even if you do, you have not changed your habits; you must change your lifestyle.
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Sunday, March 31, 2019

Cost of Living Analysis

Cost of Living Analysis

If you've ever moved from the Midwest or the South to either coast, you realize just how different the costs of day-to-day living can vary among various U.S. cities. Many transplanted families pursue cross-country moves with the knowledge that their new hometowns will be more expensive. And many employers recognize that impending cost-of-living increase with a "cost-of-living allowance" -- a slight raise in salary so that an employee may maintain his or her current standard of living without having to tighten the purse strings upon arrival.

Nevertheless, no matter how prepared you think you are, you are in for sticker shock, Your grocery bill suddenly increases dramatically ... and yet you haven't bought anything out of the ordinary from your usual fare. You can spot disparities in the simplest of items. A six-pack of soda, for example, might cost $1.50 in the South, or perhaps $.99 during an occasional sale. That same six-pack can cost you as much as $3.50 or more in major East Coast cities such as New York or Boston. Your favorite fast-food haunt in Chicago might charge you $3.59 for a burger that costs you $4.59 in Seattle. If you're moving to a major metropolitan area, you could face steep parking fees, higher rent, an increase in taxes or other penalties. So many individuals and families on the move never stop to consider what the cumulative effect of these cost-of-living increases will be on their overall standard of living.

You can, however, do a little preliminary homework and determine what your living expenses are likely to be in your new hometown -- and how much higher or lower they'll be than your current ones. Of course, you can head to the library or bookstore and explore titles on the subject, but the Web is probably your fastest and most convenient resource. Many sites are dedicated in part or in full to this subject.

It hardly bears repeating, but the cities of San Francisco and New York take the cake for ranking among the country's most expensive. Ever talked to a friend who lives in one of these cities? Guaranteed, you'll feel better about your own increasing rent. Countless apartment-renters in these cities and others pay exorbitant rents and yet still continue to haul their laundry to a local Laundromat because they either aren't provided with laundry machines in their units or even in their buildings. Such inconveniences make it imperative that you determine to the best of your ability how much money you'll need in your new hometown to maintain your current standard of living -- whatever that might be. That preparatory work will go a long way toward decreasing the stress surrounding your move. And if you're negotiating a cost-of-living increase with your employer prior to a transfer, doing your research is worth the effort.
(See Virtual Relocation's Relo Smart)

While cost-of-living Web sites are many, they're not all created equal. Many cost-of-living comparisons fail to take into consideration the effect that changes in income, housing quality and/or size of household will have upon the availability of disposable income. An organization called Runzheimer International, which specializes in this very subject, recommends that consumers take into account four primary factors when considering cost-of-living changes: housing, transportation, goods and services, and taxes.

Each one of these factors contains subcategories. For example, housing includes rent or mortgage payment and interest, as well as real estate taxes, home insurance and maintenance. Goods and services is inclusive of a near-limitless array of subcategories, including clothing, medical care, recreation, restaurants, groceries and more. Transportation includes not only the expenses involved in owning one or more cars; it also includes your car insurance and registration fees, taxes, gas, maintenance, tires and more. Transportation also might include bus fees, subway token fees, toll charges, ferry charges or other related costs. And your taxes could include a myriad of charges: sales tax, property taxes, state income tax, local taxes, Social Security, and more.

A cost-of-living analysis can certainly be an eye-opener for any prospective transferee. And the reality of how much bite it's going to take out of the budget causes many employees to decline the offer of a transfer (if, indeed, it is an offer as opposed to a command). Aside from cost-of-living concerns, other reasons why prospective transferees decline a move include top nine reasons offers are refused. Children, and the emotional impact that a move could have upon them, are a common reason for declines, followed by disinterest in moving to a new location (and loyalty to one's current hometown), a conflict with one's spouse or partner over employment issues and concern about the effect that the transfer could have upon one's career in the long term.

Runzheimer International conducted a 1998 study with some fascinating results. The organization found that married employees refuse transfer offers more often, as do employees with children, females, employees who are homeowners, employees over the age of 40, single parents and/or primary caregivers, and employees who have spent less than seven years at the corporation at which they are employed. Approximately 83 percent of the employers analyzed in the study claimed that they selected transfer candidates based solely upon their job performance and not on their "demographics" -- in other words, the above-listed personal characteristics and family structures. Seventeen percent of employers said that they did, indeed, take demographics into consideration when selecting candidates for a transfer. Such personal considerations, of course, are much easier to account for when one is employed by a smaller, more tight-knit organization. While larger corporations certainly maintain files on their associates to which human resources representatives may refer during any transfer candidate selection, if an organization is closer-knit, allowing employer and employees frequent interaction (social as well as professional), it's more likely that an employer will take demographic characteristics under consideration when it's time to select transfer candidates.

After doing your homework, you've determined that your salary (see The Salary Calculator) won't allow you to maintain your current standard of living in your new hometown (even if you were offered an increase), you can certainly negotiate for a raise. Many employers will value open communication during this process. Your honesty will help them with the transfers they try to negotiate in the future with other employees. As we enter the year 2000 and head into a new century, employers are realizing they're going to have to sweeten the pot, so to speak, more than ever before in order to warm their employees up to the idea of a transfer. Family-friendly policies being instituted in workplaces nationwide are representative of a growing national shift in priorities -- the recognition that life has to find a careful balance between work and home. Employers increasingly are providing financial compensation, as well as job-finding assistance, for spouses who may have a gap between the time they sever current job ties and attempt to establish new ones in their new hometown; financial bonuses and other compensation (for example, a certain amount of free trips back to their hometown each year at the expense of the company, which is particularly common in the event of an international transfer); and a broadening of the definition of who is eligible for transfer compensation packages (for example, same-sex partners). Employers also are increasingly turning to consulting organizations to help determine how to best compensate their transfer candidates.

But while many employers are doing their homework, you can't always count on it. So do yours; it's a good insurance policy for you and your family. After all, it's much easier to negotiate additional assistance, financial or otherwise, prior to a transfer instead of after a transfer. Get on the Web, do a search on the subject, and head to your library, as well. Talk to your friends and fellow associates who have experienced transfers. Lay your cards out on the table, and be honest with your employer. It can make the difference for both of you.

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Thursday, March 28, 2019

How Much Rent is Too Much Rent?

How Much Rent is Too Much Rent?

You want what every apartment renter wants: the most comfortable surroundings you can get for the lowest possible monthly rent. Some of today's newly constructed apartment communities have taken luxury to an entirely new level. Some complexes have gas fireplaces, TV monitors by the front door, drive-through mail service, and office equipment for their tenants, among other creature comforts. Every renter has to consider the importance of amenities like these. Are they important enough to you to merit a rent increase of perhaps $200 more than the rent you pay now, at a modest yet affordable complex? While some of us consider an apartment as just a place to hang one's hat, others place a premium on home surroundings. But how do you determine how much you can stretch your budget -- without ending up in the poorhouse in the process?

One suggestion, provided by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, is to spend no more than 25 percent of your monthly gross income on your rent. For example, if your annual salary is $30,000 per year, or $2,500 per month, you shouldn't plan to spend more than $625 per month on rent. And although it goes without saying, it's important to remember that the extra money you allocate for rent in a slightly more upscale complex means less money for your other expenses -- utilities, loan payments, entertainment, food, and most important, savings.

Here's a short checklist of factors, provided by Florida-based Apartment Hunters, that you'll want to consider when checking out a neighborhood. Of course, some of these factors may mean more to you than others, and you may want to consider some additional factors of your own.

  • Is it close to your place of employment?
  • Is the neighborhood safe?
  • Is it close to a good school system?
  • Is it close to your church?
  • Is it close to stores, banks and the post office?
  • Is it close to public transportation?
  • What are the parking regulations (if you own a car)?

First-time apartment renters share one thing in common: surprise at just how many hidden expenses they encounter. Hiring movers and paying your first month's rent only represent two small pieces of what can be a rather expensive pie. In addition, you're going to be subjected to a credit check, and you're required to prove that your gross monthly income is at a certain level, in order to provide your complex with some degree of security that you can pay your rent each month. So if you've overestimated your financial abilities in the past, either failing to make rent payments or credit-card payments, now is the time when that history could come back to haunt you. Here's a brief run-down of some of those hidden expenses -- and pre-move procedures -- of which many renters either aren't aware, or that they overlook in the excitement and bustle of moving:

Security deposits. Security deposits range from $100 to a full month's rent; the average deposit is approximately $250. Some apartments require separate deposits for roommates. Credit application fees are generally $10 to $35.

Verifiable income. Verifiable gross monthly income is at least three times the monthly rent. For example, a rent of $500 would require a minimum of $1,500 gross monthly income.

Credit check. A credit check will be conducted by the apartment community or management company representing the community.

Rental history. Any previous rental history will be verified, and mortgage payments may be included as rental history. Additionally, some communities are also conducting criminal background checks.

Leases. All apartments require a written lease. Lease terms typically are seven to 12 months. Most leases are written for 12 months. Shorter lease terms and month-to-month options often are available at premium rates.

Utilities. You rent will often include sewer, water, trash, and pest control. Gas and electricity are almost always paid separately by the tenant.

Pet deposits. Although many apartment complexes allow pets, they require residents to pay dearly for the privilege of setting up house with Fido. Pet deposits are stiff, and tenants are charged per pet. Deposits range anywhere from $100 to $300 per pet, and either all or a portion is nonrefundable. Some complexes charge additional rent for pets -- on top of the deposit. Pet size is commonly restricted to 20 pounds and 12 inches in height, although some communities do allow larger pets.

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